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Module Catalogue

SCQF Level: 09  

Module Code: SOC303

Credit Value: 20  

Year: 2017/8

Term: Term 1

School: School of Social and Health Sciences

Description

This module will examine the history of race and racism in 19th, 20th and 21st century Britain, from the 'Scramble for Africa' through the postwar/post-colonial period to the present. It will examine the various forces, processes and discourses through which race, ethnicity and the racialised subject have been constructed, shaped and changed. It will also examine theoretical approaches to and debates about race and ethnicity, racism, race relations and anti-racism, and how these have developed in response to both historical developments and social-political activism.

Aims

The aim of this module is to provide students with: a critically informed understanding of the history of race and racism in Britain; theories of race, ethnicity, racism and prejudice; and the relationship between theories and concepts of race and ethnicity, power, history and activism.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this module the student should be able to:

1.  Understand and critically engage with the history of race, racism and immigration in 20th century Britain.

2.  Understand and critically engage with the history and development of the concepts of race and ethnicity.

3.  Understand and critically engage with the relationship between the theorisation and conceptualisation of race and ethnicity, racism and antiracism, power, history and activism.

4.  Have knowledge of and critically engage with the diverse sociological (and wider) theories of race, ethnicity, racism and prejudice.

5.  Understand and critically engage with theories and concepts of race, racism, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, power, inequality, prejudice, difference, representation & identity.

6.  Work in both an individual and group setting, and develop critical, collaborative, written and oral presentation skills.

Indicative Content

1 The Concept and Construction of Race and Ethnicity

This section will look at the concept and construction of race and ethnicity, and the production of racial knowledge from the colonial period to the present.

2 Race, Ethnicity and Nation

This section will examine the (re)construction and relationship between race, ethnicity and nation in Britain in light of postwar/ post-colonial immigration and the end of empire.

3 Race, Ethnicity and Identity

This section will examine the the politics, construction and expression of racial and ethnic identities in post-colonial Britain in response to colonialism, migration, discrimination and racism.

4 Race and Class

This section will examine the relationship between race and class as sites of social-political identification, power, inequality, political struggle and analysis, as well as debates over which is the most effective framework for analysis and activism.

5 Race and Gender

This section will examine the relationship between race and gender as sites of social-political identification, power, inequality, political struggle and analysis, as well as debates over which is the most effective framework for analysis and activism.

6 Race, Crime, Civil Unrest and Political Protest

This section will examine the relationship (within analysis and representation) between race, the law, crime, civil unrest and political protest against socioeconomic conditions, policing and state policy.

7 Anti-Racism, Race Relations and Multiculturalism

This section will examine the history and development of anti-racist and race relations discourses, activism, strategies and legislation, how they have attempted to combat forms of racism, discrimination and inequality, and debates surrounding them.

8 Race, Ethnicity and the Politics of Popular Culture

This section will examine popular culture (e.g. music, film or television) in terms of postcolonial cultural politics, multiculturalism, representation, identity and political activism.

Statement on Teaching, Learning and Assessment

The module will help students to acquire knowledge and understanding of the history and politics of, and theoretical approaches to, race and ethnicity. Students will have lectures each week and these will be followed by seminars/tutorials. These will involve group work, discussions and presentations that will apply what the students learn from lectures and readings. These will also help students to develop their understanding and critical engagement with the course subject matter and related issues. Assessment will be based on an essay and written exam. The essay will help develop and assess students¿ planning, research and writing skills, as well as their knowledge and understanding of, and critical engagement with, the course subject matter and material. The exam will help develop students¿ knowledge and understanding of, and critical engagement with, the course subject matter and material, as well as more practical time management skills. In terms of T&L, this module makes use of approaches and engages with technologies that support the development of enquiry based and collaborative learning and engagement. This is done through in class collaborative group discussions, smaller group activities and presentations. Students will reflect on this method of learning at an end of semester discussion and debriefing and in their course evaluations. This module, its subject matter, emphasis on critical thinking and analysis, activities, assessments, combination of independant and groupwork activities, as well as demand for reflection and reflexivity about their existing knowledge and assumptions about race, racism, nationalism and national identity, in all their complexity, will ensure that the the students develop and reflect on graduate attributes (e.g. becoming flexible collaborators, determined creators, challenging complexity and driving change, and confident thinkers)

Teaching and Learning Work Loads

Total 200
Lecture 20
Tutorial/Seminar 10
Supervised Practical Activity 0
Unsupervised Practical Activity 1
Assessment 30
Independent 139

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Guidance notes:

Credit Value – The total value of SCQF credits for the module. 20 credits are the equivalent of 10 ECTS credits. A full-time student should normally register for 60 SCQF credits per semester.

Disclaimer: We make every effort to ensure that the information on our website is accurate but it is possible that some changes may occur prior to the academic year of entry. The modules listed in this catalogue are offered subject to availability during academic year 2017/18 , and may be subject to change for future years.

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